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Bigastro. Resort Guide

Bigastro is a very quiet picturesque town with fabulous mountain views of La Sierra de Callosa and Orihuela. The town of Bigastro is a typical inland Spanish town, surrounded by orange and lemon groves it has its own market day every week, Alicante airport and city are only 45 minutes distance, whilst the historic cities of Orihuela and Murcia with their good quality shopping facilities are close by.

Bigastro has everything necessary for enjoying a pleasant lifestyle; a good selection of shops, restaurants and bars. A very nice municipal park, with swimming pool, tennis courts, children's play area, etc. It is approximately a 25 minute drive to various Blue Flag beaches (Torrevieja, La Zenia, Campoamor and Cabo Roig) and an abundance of bars, restaurants and shops.

Situated on the CV-95 south-east of the town of Orihuela, Bigastro is some 14km away from the beaches of the Costa Blanca and Orihuela Costa. It is approx. 6 km from Orihuela, 60 km from Alicante and 205 km from Valencia.

Though there is evidence of settlements in the area going back to the Bronze Age, the known history of Bigastro only goes back to 1701 when it was founded as the home for some 24 families, relocated from the larger town of Orihuela. It was founded primarily as an agricultural community with a leaning towards hemp and the production of linen, it also became an important area for citrus farming. It later developed some light industry, which continues today.

Near to Bigastro is a recreation area known as La Pedrera, with mountain bike trails, walking trails together with barbeque and camping areas.

Bigastro holds a weekly outdoor market where fresh, locally grown produce can be bought along with the usual clothes and leather goods.

Bigastro has a good selection of shops, bars and restaurants and a pleasant municipal park, with tennis courts, swimming pool and a children's play area.
The town of Bigastro was primarily part of Vega Baja region before it was made a part of the Kingdom of Murcia. Under the Torrijos Treaty, the municipality was adjoined to the Kingdom of Valencia. With the casting out of the Muslims in the 17th century, residents from other parts of Spain came to repopulate the town. As the town was integrated into the Alicante Province, Bigastro experienced increased levels of development.

Architecture

For many centuries, the town remained under the control of the church. Although the town underwent several changes to separate themselves from the church, their influence remains in other ways such as its architecture. One of the most important edifices is the church built in honor of Our Lady of Bethlehem. The structure is distinguished by its well lit central dome with four scallops, one said to symbolize each of the four evangelists.

Beyond the walls of the town are remnants of earlier civilizations. First time visitors are encouraged to travel to the archaeological sites near Bigastro. There are two areas of importance: the La Loma and Los Palacios. La Loma is a large hill rich in clay, sandstone and marl. Although preserved well, the area has suffered much due to erosion caused by the immense impact of illegal logging in the area. Within this area are relics dating back to Late Bronze and Iberian eras. On the other hand, the area containing Los Palacios contains relics traced to the 2nd century BC until 2nd century AD.

Tourist Attraction

The town of Bigastro is known for more than its share of natural and manmade landmarks. Its people are renowned in the region for being musically and artistically inclined. When in town, travelers are encouraged to see some of the local musical performances. One group worth seeing is the Choral Manuel Moya. Began in 1987, the group produces numerous concerts including during the Christmas Masses, the celebration in honor of San Joaquin as well as in honor of San Jose. Every Saturday, the choir practices in an area of the village locally referred to as “the nuns.”

History

The town of Bigastro was primarily part of Vega Baja region before it was made a part of the Kingdom of Murcia. Under the Torrijos Treaty, the municipality was adjoined to the Kingdom of Valencia. With the casting out of the Muslims in the 17th century, residents from other parts of Spain came to repopulate the town. As the town was integrated into the Alicante Province, Bigastro experienced increased levels of development.

What to do

A trip to any local Spanish town is never complete without experiencing a local fiesta. Regardless of the size of the town or city, they are known to host a number of festivities, most of which in honor of important religious figures. These are celebrations filled with color and activity, observed with fireworks and a feast of local dishes. The fiesta in honor of Santa Ana is a vital celebration as it is where the name of one of the barrios originated from. Another is the Feast of San Isidro, celebrated for the last 59 years. It is a pilgrimage in honor of the saint when the statue is carried to La Pedrera.

Sport

Sport is a vital part of the life of the residents living in Bigastro. The terrain and weather is conducive for physical activity. Football is a popular sport in much of Spain. Numerous local clubs dedicated to sports encourage younger generations to take up the sport to become better as well as remain physically active and competitive. Other sports being encouraged include basketball, tennis, rhythmic gymnastics, mountain climbing and swimming.

Golf Courses

Bigastro golfing is an important aspect of the town and the surrounding area. Alicante is known locally and internationally for a host of golf courses. Within the town itself is a local golf society which supports the activity. Tourists will find it more difficult to select which golf course to play a few holes in, because of the variety available. Some of the nearest golf courses are located in nearby Orihuela. There is the Quara Golf Course and the Emilio Rodriguez Pareja, both of which are located in the city of Orihulela.
What to eat in Bigastro

Apart from the tasty Spanish food which is offered in Bigastro, you can partake of extraordinary fare from many different countries including Dutch, Chinese, Indian, Cantonese, English, and Hungarian. The cookery reflects the variety of the area, you should by no means be stuck for deals when eating.